Pictures of a water cooled

Carrier Packaged air conditioning unit circa 1950.

Open belt drive 5FD and one converted to 06D

Image of water cooled carrier packaged unit circa 1950. converted from R500 to R22. Still works perfect.
View of Carrier water cooled packaged system circa 1950. This system has been converted from R500 (Careen 7) to R22, by changing the expansion valves and increasing the pulley size on the open belt drive compressor to slow it down to accommodate the heavier R22.
The big cast iron pipe is a steam line for the heating system.


Image of Carrier 06D (right) replacing open belt drive (left) . Notice oil pressure controls and safety switches added to system. previous compressors would only last a few seasons.
Front view of the system Carrier 5FD open belt drive (left) and new Carrier 06D (right). Notice the two new oil pressure safety controls added when the 06D was installed. Previous systems did not have oil safeties and compressors would only last a few seasons. Notice the great big suction line filter dryer in the liquid line. This system only had a set of screen strainers (top image round objects near the expansion valves), not very good for removing pieces of torn up compressor from years gone by.


Rear view of 06D compressor (left) and open belt drive 5F (right). Notice the crankcase heaters installed in both compressors. Previous compressors didn't have heaters and would only last a few seasons.
Rear view of 06D compressor (left) and open belt drive 5F (right). Notice the crankcase heaters installed in both compressors (the open belt drive unit has an immersion well). Previous compressors didn't have heaters and would only last a few seasons (amazing that they lasted that long). If these units had oil safety controls the system would not run without tripping on low oil pressure, instead they just tore up compressor after compressor.

News update:
    May 1st 2001. After problems of the system going off on "high head pressure" we convinced the owner to have us clean the water cooled condensers. This was done by removing the heads on each end on the tubes and running a brush through the tubes with a power drill. There are 8 groups of 4 tubes each for a total of 32 per condenser. This was a major job but paid off because we were able to remove years of calcium build up. The final step is to run hydrochloric acid through the system to remove the rest of the calcium carbonate (CaCo3).

    In the process of cleaning we discovered that the swimming pool pump that is used to move the water through the condensers is connected backwards. Instead of  the water being pushed through the system it is arranged so the weight of the water from the cooling tower on the roof is pushing the water through the condensers instead the the pump doing the work.

Written By:  Scott Meenen N3SJH of:
G&S MECHANICAL SERVICES.
Specializing in Mechanical, Controls and Electrical Modifications Of
Heating, Air conditioning, Refrigeration, Cold storage,
Ice Production and Food preservation. Anything having to do with Heat and Energy.
Serving MD, DC, and Northern VA.
Contact us by pager: 1-877-467-2914
Page us by e-mail 4103560613.3732505@pagenet.net 240Chrs max.

Email us at: jsmeenen@toad.net

                This text written by: Scott Meenen * G & S Mechanical
                        copyright at common law.
 

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